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Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Metro and Future ‘don’t trust you’

Metro Boomin and Future’s collaborative album falls short of high expectations.
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Epic Records
“We Don’t Trust You” album cover.

Leland Tyler Wayne, widely recognized as Metro Boomin, and Nayvadius DeMun Cash, renowned under his stage name Future, joined forces to produce the collaborative album “We Don’t Trust You.” With such prominent features including Kendrick Lamar, The Weeknd and Travis Scott, I had high hopes for this album.

Metro Boomin’s previous album, “Heroes & Villains,” stands out as one of my favorite albums of all time with captivating production and composition. However, Future’s music hasn’t resonated with me as much, as it is often characterized by minimal vocal variation and lackluster songs. Still, I was excited by the potential greatness and synergy that these two artists can produce.

The lead track, “We Don’t Trust You,” defies the usual trend of intro tracks tending to be more subdued to introduce the rest of the album. “We Don’t Trust You” breaks away from this pattern with its dynamic shifts in production, vocals and overall flow, elevating it to be a standout on the album.

Following the impressive start, the album maintains momentum with “Young Metro,” a track that blends rap and exceptional vocals, thanks to The Weeknd. However, the next three tracks fail to sustain this initial strength, with minimal vocal variation. Despite this, “Type Sh*t” stands out among the trio, largely because of the contribution of Travis Scott, whose feature injects energy into the track.

The next song, “Like That,” was one of the most anticipated tracks on the album, having been previewed at a concert before its release. With its high-energy beats and the much-awaited feature of Kendrick Lamar, it carried high expectations. However, despite initial excitement, the album version didn’t align with me as much as the concert version did. The bass along with a better flow from Kendrick made the concert version far superior.

The subsequent six tracks, “Slimed In,” “Magic Don Juan (Princess Diana),” “Cinderella,” “Runnin Outta Time,” “Fried (She a Vibe)” and “Ain’t No Love,” collectively form the most underwhelming stretch of the album. Drawing from the remnants of “Ice Attack” and “Claustrophobic,” these tracks exhibit a repetitive and monotonous nature, characterized by minimal variance in vocals. This section fails to maintain the album’s earlier energy, resulting in a notable dip.

The album, however, shifts in the following two tracks. “Everyday Hustle” injects a somewhat upbeat and livery mood into an otherwise gloomy album, adding depth and complexity to the composition and vocals. Conversely, “GTA” contrasts with a more gloomy mood, returning to Future’s style. However, the track’s production complements Future’s strengths exceptionally well, resulting in one of the album’s standout tracks. 

The album concludes with the last three tracks: “Seen it All,” “WTFYM” and “Where My Twin @ – Bonus,” which fail to leave a lasting impression and simply wrap up the album. Overall, the album was an enjoyable listen and provided insight into what has contributed to Metro Boomin and Future’s widespread success. Hopefully, future collaborations between the two will build upon the better tracks in their follow-up, “We Still Don’t Trust You.”

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About the Contributor
Sidharth Sharma
Sidharth Sharma, Staff Reporter
Sidharth is a sophomore staff reporter, and this year is his first year on The Viewer. Awards: Best of SNO - The teacher shortage crisis Best of SNO - Should legacy admissions still exist?
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