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Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Mounds View High School's student news site.

The Viewer

Nerf war brings celebration and controversy

With over 160 people participating, the annual Mounds View Nerf War is currently ongoing. However, incidents from other schools and past years raise safety concerns.
Daniel Lee takes a picture with Yasir Reyale after eliminating him on Nov. 17.
@mvnerfwar
Daniel Lee takes a picture with Yasir Reyale after eliminating him on Nov. 17.

The Nerf War began on Nov. 2, at 3:15 p.m., with over 40 teams of four Mounds View juniors and seniors competing in the annual event and using Nerf toy guns for a cash prize. 

Each time a player secures a kill by shooting an opponent, they get “points” for showing proof: any picture receives two points, a video gets four and both get six points. Teams can use these points to revive eliminated competitors or pay $20 to re-enter the competition once.

The cash prize consists of the money that the participants spend on the game, including the $5 entry fee, and is won by the last team standing. Everyone must have their Snapchat location, or “Snap Map,” on at all times to not risk disqualification. This ensures that the hosts and other players know where everyone is located. Participants are allowed to target anyone if they are outside but are not allowed to strike on the Mounds View campus unless both parties consent to have a one-on-one match. When the game started, all teams had to kill someone before the week ended, or two players on their team would be eliminated.

The large number of students participating led to teams creating strategies, such as junior Cali Steven’s team, which used “designated drivers and shooters” to target others. However, the war took a lot of effort, and many felt relieved that they were eliminated. “I was happy to get out,” said junior Kate Loween. 

During the beginning of the event, players were able to use immunity to prevent themselves from getting shot. The immunity items consisted of a propeller hat, swim goggles and 24 cents in their left pocket. The individual had to remove the items if they planned to target another player. However, teams voted to remove this immunity the day after the game began.

To ensure there are no liabilities when competing, the organizers put together rules to ensure the safety of participants. Based on last year’s event, implementing new rules was necessary due to safety concerns, with reports of trespassing and dangerous vehicle conduct.

Beyond Mounds View, many other students in schools state-wide have played this game, resulting in numerous deaths and accidents, such as at Lakeville High School, where two teenagers died in a car crash while participating in their school’s Nerf War in 2015. In response to these concerns, the organizers at Mounds View implemented a specific rule that every kill has to be on foot and players must be entirely out of the car to get a kill or to be killed. 

Many individuals found the event to be enjoyable. “I was excited to play…it was worth it,” said Stevens. However, some were not as excited. “I would say [participating was] not worth it. Getting in trouble is never worth anything,” said junior Calvin Fant. Despite the constant paranoia, planning and safety concerns, only five teams are currently left, and the Mounds View 23-24 Nerf War will soon see a winner.

About the Contributor
Zariyah Howell, Staff Reporter
Zariyah is a junior staff reporter, and this year is her first year on The Viewer.
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